Battle of the Sexes: How Men and Women View Money

It’s been well-documented the differences between women and men, and money habits are no exception. Differing opinions on spending and saving are likely some of the biggest reasons why money is the most common reason married couples fight, with couples averaging three arguments per month about financial issues. Additionally, 3 in 10 married adults admit to potentially deceitful behavior about money, and arguments about money are the most common predictors of a future divorce. The question is, why is money such a sensitive topic?

 

Who I Am and How I Can Help

While everyone changes and evolves as we get older, there are two things that have remained constant throughout my life: a strong pull towards personal finance and a passion for helping people. I discovered my natural knack for numbers and interest in financial literacy in high school and in college. After graduating, however, I wasn’t inspired by the industry’s structure at that point. Independent advisors weren’t as common and I didn’t want to become a stockbroker or financial representative with a big corporate that required me to fulfill quotas or push clients into certain products. I instead chose to pursue a career a role in financial reporting and analysis in the retirement services industry. 

Would A Health Savings Account Save You Money?

The annual cost of providing healthcare for a family of four hit $25,826 in 2016, which is triple what it cost in 2001. That total includes $14,793 of employer contributions, $6,717 of employee-paid premiums, and $4,316 of out-of-pocket costs. Health care costs are not a trivial matter and can easily throw a family’s finances off track if they are not prepared. For those interested in saving towards health care costs, the government has provided an excellent tool: Health Savings Accounts (HSAs).

Why I Became a Financial Advisor

I’ve often been asked why I entered this industry and became a financial advisor. Like many people, I didn’t grow up knowing what I wanted to be or what I wanted to do with my career. What I did know is that I liked the idea of solving complex problems with creative solutions. With the desire to tackle real-life problems and puzzles people often face, I entered the financial services industry in 1997.

What We Do and How We Help

What We Do and How We Help

Money may seem strictly analytical, but it plays a huge role in our emotional lives. According to a stress report conducted by American Psychological Association, nearly three-quarters of adults feel stressed about money at least some of the time, and almost one-quarter experience extreme stress about money. Emotions affect financial decisions we make, which can have an adverse impact in the long run, whether it’s taking too much risk with investments or not having proper insurance policies in place. Even though finances are the first thing people worry about, they’re also the last thing they feel comfortable talking about with their loved ones.

Why I Became a Financial Advisor

Why I Became a Financial Advisor

While everyone changes and evolves as we get older, there are two things that have remained constant throughout my life: a strong pull towards personal finance and a passion for helping people. I discovered my natural knack for numbers and interest in financial literacy in high school and in college. After graduating, however, I wasn’t inspired by the industry’s structure at that point. Independent advisors weren’t as common and I didn’t want to become a stockbroker or financial representative with a big corporate that required me to fulfill quotas or push clients into certain products. I instead chose to pursue a career a role in financial reporting and analysis in the retirement services industry.